Friday, September 28, 2012

Fences: Andersonville

Living in the Deep South means many Civil War sites that can be visited. Not too far from our town is Andersonville. An area dedicated to the a part of Civil War history, to one of the largest Confederate military prisons during the Civil War. The prison was only in operation for about 14 months, but during those 14 months, such saddness, such inhumane conditions. . . more than 45,000 prisons came through this site, around 13,000 died in this camp.

Now, it is Andersonville Village. A state park with so many accounts and history of that time and that spots dark details. But they do a great job and sharing history that was beyond the fences of this one prison. There are battle reinactments, but there are also reinactments of what life was like during this time. There military funerals, still today. And many ceremonies honoring various aspects of our military history.

We visited on a quiet day, walking with the boys through the sections and stories of the once was prison. Reading about the hunger, the loss, the desperate attempts of escape. Realizing how different our world is, in some ways at least.






Joining in with "FENCES"


Thank you Jan and Jer

11 comments:

Grandma Barb's This and That said...

Great fence and the story behind it.
Thanks for visiting and your nice comment.

TexWisGirl said...

some serious fences / walls there.

W. Latane Barton said...

Thanks for sharing your visit to Andersonville with us. I've never been but have heard of it and would like to see it someday.

Loredana Donovan said...

Interesting history behind theses fences ...

laura.forestdreams:) said...

it's sad walking through places like this...

i've been to Magnolia Springs, during the civil war, was known as Camp Lawton, 'the world's largest prison' at that time. so interesting, but sad.

ANYWAY, cool looooong fence line! =)

Bev said...

Thanks for sharing. Love to see history pictures!

Maggie May said...

Oh my...... those stocks don't look too comfortable but at least the poor child wasn't pelted with rotten fruit and eggs!
Maggie X

Nuts in May

Jan n Jer said...

Love to look back on history...makes me appreciate our modern day life!

Elaine said...

Thank you for telling the story behind the fence, fascinating and very sad.

Maple Lane said...

Very interesting and I enjoyed your photos very much.

Tanya said...

i always wanted to visit here while we lived in georgia but just never got around to it...my daughter got to go on a field trip there though!